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Biology Book :: The Mortal Sea: Fishing the Atlantic in the Age of Sail from Belknap Press

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Product Description

Microscope Science are proud to offer the famous Biology Book :: The Mortal Sea: Fishing the Atlantic in the Age of Sail.

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Manufacturer Description

Given that the Viking ascendancy in the Center Ages, the Atlantic has shaped the lives of individuals who rely on it for survival. And just as certainly, individuals have shaped the Atlantic. In his innovative account of this interdependency, W. Jeffrey Bolster, a historian and expert seafarer, normally takes us by way of a millennium-extended environmental historical past of our effect on one of the largest ecosystems in the world.

Although overfishing is typically imagined of as a modern day difficulty, Bolster reveals that humans had been reworking the sea extended prior to manufacturing unit trawlers turned fishing from a handliner’s art into an industrial enterprise. The western Atlantic’s legendary fishing financial institutions, stretching from Cape Cod to Newfoundland, have captivated fishermen for more than 5 hundred a long time. Bolster follows the effects of this siren’s track from its medieval European origins to the arrival of industrialized fishing in American waters at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Blending maritime biology, ecological perception, and a remarkable solid of characters, from noteworthy explorers to researchers to an military of unidentified fishermen, Bolster tells a story that is equally ecological and human: the prelude to an environmental catastrophe. Over generations, harvesters developed a silent catastrophe as the sea could no more time renew itself. Bolster writes in the hope that the intimate connection humans have extended experienced with the ocean, and the species that dwell inside of it, can be restored for foreseeable future generations.

Product Information

Given that the Viking ascendancy in the Center Ages, the Atlantic has shaped the lives of individuals who rely on it for survival. And just as certainly, individuals have shaped the Atlantic. In his innovative account of this interdependency, W. Jeffrey Bolster, a historian and expert seafarer, normally takes us by way of a millennium-extended environmental historical past of our effect on one of the largest ecosystems in the world.

Although overfishing is typically imagined of as a modern day difficulty, Bolster reveals that humans had been reworking the sea extended prior to manufacturing unit trawlers turned fishing from a handliner’s art into an industrial enterprise. The western Atlantic’s legendary fishing financial institutions, stretching from Cape Cod to Newfoundland, have captivated fishermen for more than 5 hundred a long time. Bolster follows the effects of this siren’s track from its medieval European origins to the arrival of industrialized fishing in American waters at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Blending maritime biology, ecological perception, and a remarkable solid of characters, from noteworthy explorers to researchers to an military of unidentified fishermen, Bolster tells a story that is equally ecological and human: the prelude to an environmental catastrophe. Over generations, harvesters developed a silent catastrophe as the sea could no more time renew itself. Bolster writes in the hope that the intimate connection humans have extended experienced with the ocean, and the species that dwell inside of it, can be restored for foreseeable future generations.

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